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Thursday
Feb142008

Cyberbullying guide - as promised..

As promised...

Click to access .pdf

 cbg.jpg

 

Many thanks to Nancy Willard for her permission to use materials from her website, her book, and her kind advice (some of which I actually took, but probably not enough.) 

If you would like a Word version of this document so you can edit it for your school, let me know. 

Thursday
Feb142008

Not your grandma's librarian

LibrarGraphic.jpg

Not your grandma's librarian - Scholastic Administrator
Hell, it's not your older brother's librarian! - The Blue Skunk

Very heartening to see the article "Meet Your New School Library Media Specialist" in the February issue of Scholastic Administrator magazine. AASL President Sara Kelly Johns and ISTE CEO Don Knezek (whose librarian wife, Jana,  seems to have trained him well) are quoted extensively.

The article included questions from South Carolina's ADEPT professional development system that administrators can use when interviewing LMS applicants. Worth a look.

Nothing revolutionary here for those of us involved on a daily basis with professionally current library media specialists, but it's great to see this in a publication aimed at administrators.

I've been following Justin Medved and Dennis Harter posts over on Dangerously Irrelevant this week (Part 1, 2, 3, 4). Justin and Dennis are tech integration specialists (as I understand it) at the International School of Bangkok. It is really fun to watch techs see The Light on the Road to Damascus - that the most powerful use of technology in schools is in helping make students information literate. They write:

Over the school year we ... came up five essential questions that we felt addressed the core elements of a comprehensive technology and learning curriculum - one focused on the thinking that was needed for the 21st century learner, rather than the technology.             
  • How do you know information is true?      
  • How do you communicate effectively?      
  • What does it mean to be a global citizen?      
  • How do I learn best?      
  • How can we be safe?

 

Something we librarians seemed to have understood for at least the past decade. Mike Eisenberg and I wrote the first version of this in 1996! I am not saying this to in any way diminish the great work of the team at ISB. We all have to experience our own epiphanies - nobody can give one. I like the simplicity of your approach.

But my question for Justin and Dennis is "where has your school's librarian been in your lives that you are just now figuring this out?!" And if s/he's been telling you about this stuff, why have you not been listening?

Thursday
Feb142008

Beginning Rubric 3 - Time management and organization

This a continuation of the 2008 revision of the CODE77 rubrics - Basic level. An introduction is here.

This rubric was not a part of the 1994 version of the basic rubrics.

III Time management and organization (NETS V.C.) 2002
Level 1     I do not use electronic tools or devices to help me keep a calendar or organize my tasks and address book..
Level 2     I can access the school’s calendar for basic schedule information.
Level 3     I use an electronic calendar program, to-do list, and address book that includes email address to help organize and schedule my professional activities. I can synchronize the information on my computer with that in my PDA (personal digital assistant).
Level 4           I store my calendar, task manager, web bookmarks, and address book online so it can be accessed from any Internet-worked computer. I help my students with using technology for time management and organizational purposes.

III Time management and organization (NETS ?.) 2008
Level 1     I do not use electronic tools or devices to help me keep a calendar or organize my tasks and address book..
Level 2     I can access the school’s calendar for basic schedule information. I can use the directory on the school's website to locate staff e-mail addresses.
Level 3     I use an integrated electronic calendar program, to-do list, and address book that includes email address to help organize and schedule my professional activities. I can synchronize the information on my computer with that in my PDA (personal digital assistant) or cell phone and my shared online calendar. I can set alerts to help remind me of upcoming meetings or events.
Level 4           I store my calendar, task manager, web bookmarks, and address book online so it can be accessed from any Internet-worked computer. I can access the shared calendars of other staff members to help schedule meetings and events. I help my students with using technology for time management and organizational purposes.

Other time management tasks? Next up: IV. Word processing