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Wednesday
Mar052008

Beginning rubric 5 - spreadsheets

This a continuation of the 2008 revision of the CODE77 rubrics - Basic level. An introduction is here.

V. Spreadsheet use (1995)
Level 1 I do not use a spreadsheet, nor can I identify any uses or features it might have which would benefit the way I work.
Level 2 I understand the use of a spreadsheet and can navigate within one. I can create a simple spreadsheet which adds a column of numbers.
Level 3 I use a spreadsheet for several applications. These spreadsheets use labels, formulas and cell references. I can change the format of the spreadsheets by changing column widths and text style. I can use the spreadsheet to make a simple graph or chart.
Level 4 I use the spreadsheet not only for my work, but have used it with students to help them improve their own data keeping and analysis skills.

V. Spreadsheet use (NETS I.A., I.B., V.C.) (2002)
Level 1 I do not use a spreadsheet, nor can I identify any uses or features it might have which would benefit the way I work.
Level 2 I understand the use of a spreadsheet and can navigate within one. I can create a simple spreadsheet that adds a column of numbers.
Level 3 I use a spreadsheet for several professional applications such as keeping a budget or analyzing student data. My spreadsheets use labels, formulas and cell references. I can change the format of the spreadsheets by changing column widths and text style. I can use the spreadsheet to make a simple graph or chart.
Level 4 I can import a spreadsheet into a word processing document or presentation program when needed. I use the spreadsheet not only for my work, but have used it with students to help them improve their own data keeping and analysis skills.

V. Spreadsheet use (NETS ?) (2008)
Level 1 I do not use a spreadsheet, nor can I identify any uses or features it might have which would benefit the way I work.
Level 2 I understand the use of a spreadsheet and can navigate within one. I can create a simple spreadsheet that adds a column of numbers. I understand the basic types of data that can be placed in cells: labels, numbers, formulas, and references.
Level 3 I use a spreadsheet for several professional applications such as keeping a budget or analyzing student data. My spreadsheets use labels, formulas and cell references. I can change the format of the spreadsheets by changing column widths and text style. I can use the spreadsheet to make a simple graph or chart. I can import and export data from a spreadsheet. I understand the difference between a workbook and a worksheet, and can create a workbook with multiple worksheets.
Level 4 I can import or link a spreadsheet into a word processing document or presentation program when needed. I can custom design a variety of graphs and charts. use the spreadsheet not only for my work, but have used it with students to help them improve their own data keeping and analysis skills. I can use cloud-based spreadsheets for collaborative and shared work.

This is an interesting rubric since in my experience, spreadsheets at their most basic level have changed very little since the days of Visicalc in the early '80s. It is among the easiest, most powerful, most feared and most underutilized tools in education. Or maybe I am just a latent math teacher.

Other time spreadsheet tasks? Next up: VI. Database use

Wednesday
Mar052008

If you missed WOW2.0 last night

Joyce (NeverEndingSearch) Valenza and I were guests on last night's Women of the Web 2.0 show talking about libraries of the future, e-books, intellectual property and a range of other topics. I don't think I've ever experienced an hour fly by so quickly!

If you missed the show, you can stream it here. Links to the resources related to the program's topic and mentioned on the show can be found here. Oh, great summary here by Cool Cat Teacher Vicki Davis who moderated the discussion.

Thanks, WOW2.0, for this chance to talk about libraries (and get in touch with my feminine side. I think it is the left one.) You are all amazing educators!

And Dr. Joyce, I always learn so much from you. Thanks.

wow2.gif 

Wednesday
Mar052008

Power of the local press

freepresstechphoto.jpg

The photo and caption appeared front page, above-the-fold in this morning's Mankato Free Press daily newspaper.  It was accompanied by this article with the headline "2005 referendum funding digital revolution." I read, as always, with great trepidation.

But the article was positive and pretty darned accurate as these things go. Thanks, reporter Tanner Kent! I just hope Ed the superintendent, gives it a positive review.

I am not sure how we do it, but our district has always managed to maintain a good relationship with the local press. While it helps that we are a very well-run district, we are also open, honest, available, and considerate to our reporters and newspaper editors.

A policy that I believe has a positive impact - indirectly - on kids.